Educational Articles

Birds + Care & Wellness

  • African greys are vulnerable to both calcium and/or vitamin A deficiencies, as well as obesity. Feeding a well-balanced diet and making sure your parrot consumes the proper proportions of foods offered will help prevent the development of these conditions. Pellets are the ideal food for your pet African grey and should represent approximately 75-80% of your bird's diet. The remainder of the diet should be comprised of fresh fruits, vegetables, and a small amount of seed (if any).

  • African grey parrots are highly intelligent birds and are now commonly bred in captivity as pets. The African grey has a charming personality and is recognized as one of the best talkers among all pet parrots. It is important to keep these smart birds busy, as boredom can lead to problems, such as feather picking and screaming. African greys require regular, preventative veterinary health checkups.

  • Our knowledge of bird nutrition is constantly evolving. This is due both to heightened awareness of the importance of nutrition and to increased research into birds different needs. As with all other animals, birds need a proper balance of carbohydrates, proteins, fat, vitamins, minerals and water. Different species of birds often require different foods.

  • The colorful Amazon parrot (Amazona sp.) is one of the most common of all the pet parrots kept in captivity. They originate from Mexico, Central America, South America, and the adjacent islands of the West Indies.

  • Bathing is very important for the proper maintenance of feathers. The dry air in our homes created by central heating and air conditioning is not conducive to the maintenance of healthy feathers and skin, so pet birds should be encouraged to bathe at least three to four times a week. This handout provides helpful tips and safety precautions for bathing your bird.

  • Elongated beak and/or toenails are reasons for veterinary care in all pet birds. Beaks should not be trimmed regularly unless performed by an avian veterinarian. Toenail trimming may be done at home, but only when taught by an experienced bird breeder/owner or avian veterinarian.

  • Blood feathers are a normal maturation process for all feathers on birds. When feathers first erupt from the skin they contain blood. Injury to the feather as it grows may cause the blood feather to become broken causing blood loss that at times may require emergency treatment by an avian veterinarian.

  • Our knowledge of bird nutrition is constantly evolving. This is due both to heightened awareness of the importance of nutrition and to increased research into birds' different needs. As with all other animals, birds need a proper balance of carbohydrates, proteins, fat, vitamins, minerals, and water. Different species of birds often require different foods. Poor nutrition is a common reason for many health problems in birds.

  • The budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulates), also referred to as a parakeet or more commonly a budgie, is perhaps the most popular pet bird worldwide. This beautiful, small bird originates from the drier regions of Australia.

  • Cleaning a bird cage should be a weekly routine. Since food particles and fecal material can harbor and entice bacterial and fungal growth, cage cleaning is extremely important to maintain a healthy environment for your bird. Soap and water make excellent cleaning solutions. Some materials, such as wood, wicker, and rope are impossible to disinfect and, therefore, should be replaced regularly.

Location


376 Scott Swamp Road
Route 6 (Next to Mama Luke's East of Wal*Mart)
Farmington, Connecticut, 06032

Phone: (860) 677-0309
Fax: 860-677-0805
Email: [email protected]

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Tuesday7:30am – 6:00pm
Wednesday7:30am – 6:00pm
Thursday7:30am – 6:00pm
Friday7:30am – 6:00pm
Saturday8:00am – 12:00pm
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